Not all value is as clear as dollars and cents

Jodie May 2019

By Jodie Greer, IT Accessibility Lead at Shell Information Technology International Limited

How many of us would have a business, or a job if there weren’t other people somewhere in the chain? Be that colleagues, customers, potential new recruits, suppliers etc. So how can you really put a value on accessibility?

In many forums I hear the same familiar questions, wanting to put a $ mark against accessibility goals and wanting to know the number of people impacted. Well, what if I told you there aren’t any statistics?

Some people would disagree with me and research shows that globally there are more than 1.3 billion people living with a disability* and together with their friends and family that group has a spending power of $8 trillion**.

Those of us in global organisations also contend with the numerous legislations around the world, meaning in some countries we cannot ask staff to share if they have a disability and sadly we all contend with the stigma that is still very apparent with regards some disabilities that makes people reluctant to share voluntarily.

In the workplace and with your customer base can you really put a value on making people as productive as they can be and/or enabling people to make use of your goods and services? Let’s not forget that accessibility doesn’t only enable people with disabilities, these good practices can prove beneficial for many. Some examples, captions can be invaluable for someone with a hearing impairment and can be just as beneficial for someone facing a language barrier, colour contrast can make all the difference for some people with a visual impairment to access information and also help those of us with good vision to stop squinting as we try to decipher what’s in front of us and good meeting practice can ensure we all take away the same messages without relying on the ability to recognise sarcasm or distinguish what’s said by motivated people all speaking at the same time.

The reason I suggest there aren’t any statistics is that the world keeps turning. Not just literally, but the demographic you are serving today will be different tomorrow and again the day after and so on. Staff who do not require adjustments today may do tomorrow, customers who can use your products today may not be able to next week. Are you prepared to lose them? That’s the true value of accessibility.

Most of us love a statistic, so I would say think about the value you put on your staff and customers and whether you can run an effective and commercially viable business without them (if you can please share how as that sounds like an opportunity not to be missed and the lottery isn’t working out for me) and then translate that in to $$ to decide if you can afford to be anything but truly accessible.

Accessibility is simply good business sense and the Business Disability Forum’s Technology Taskforce provide support and guidance to those who want to be successful.

Data sources: *The World Bank and **The Global Economics of Disability

Stat of the day: Economic activity of the long and shot-term sick

By Angela Matthews

The latest Labour Market Statistics have been released by the Office for National Statistics this morning. The data shows that 84,000 less people are economically inactive due to long-term sickness. Economic inactivity due to short-term sickness, however, has risen by 22,000. A ‘wave’ illustration of the trends since 2011 looks like this:

Line graph showing the number of long-term and temporary sick between 2011 and 2013

Stat of the day: Labour Market Statistics – May to July 2013

By Angela Matthews

This quarter’s Labour Market Statistics have been released this morning and there’s a little bit of good news. The figures are for May-July 2013.

There are 42,000 less people economically inactive due to long-term sickness compared with the figure for February to April 2013. This gives a percentage of 22.3 per cent of people who are currently economically inactive due to long-term sickness – a total of 1,994,000 people.

The figure has fluctuated up and down slightly each quarter but has always – since May 2011 – stayed within the region of the 2-million-and-something. Today’s stats release is the first time since then that the figure has dropped below 2 million.