Our HPE Living Progress Challenge journey

By Vanessa Hardy, Digital Project Manager, BDF


Back in January 2016 we were approached with an opportunity that was challenging but too good a chance to miss.

The Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Living Progress Challenge invited the global community to bring forward great ideas that address social issues through digitally-enabled solutions.

The challenge was to answer the question: What software applications and digital services would you create to improve people’s lives?

Lucy Ruck, Technology Taskforce Manager at BDF, presents the Dynamic Accessibility Maturity Model to an audience in Brooklyn, New York.

Lucy Ruck, Technology Taskforce Manager at BDF, presents the Dynamic Accessibility Maturity Model to an audience in Brooklyn, New York.

At Business Disability Forum our remit is to support business to get things right for disabled people. Our Technology Taskforce was established to help businesses make their technologies more accessible for disabled customers, employees and stakeholders. Using their collective knowledge and skills, our Taskforce members developed our Accessibility Maturity Model (AMM), a management tool to help organisations assess and improve their commitment to accessibility.

While the AMM’s static framework was well used by our members and was signposted and leveraged by organisations including Gartner and Forester, the HPE Living Challenge provided us with a potential opportunity to create a dynamic, responsive version of the tool with international appeal. Our commitment was to offer the tool free of charge to any organisation that wanted to improve accessibility for the estimated 1 billion people globally with an impairment or disability.

At the beginning of May we were delighted to hear that we had been selected as one of 20 semi-finalists out of 130 proposals to be awarded design and development support from HPE and crowd sourcing platform Topcoder to build a Minimum Viable Product software prototype of our dynamic AMM.

Over the following three months, we worked closely with the HPE and Topcoder teams in the USA who were also providing free project management, UX/technical architect services alongside their design and prototyping services. Our collective challenge was not only to develop a responsive prototype that met the competition brief, but to also ensure that it met AA level accessibility for disabled users based on WCAG2.0. We were delighted to find out that we had made it through to the final 10 and that we would be pitching to senior leaders within HPE.

Towards the end of July the competition moved into its final phase. As the prototype was finalised, we started to work with an external coach to prepare our pitch for the live ‘Demo Day’ in New York on 3 August.

And so on 3 August, our Technology Taskforce Manager Lucy Ruck and Market Insight & Research Manager, Ashley Teaupa joined the other nine Living Progress Challenge finalists at the New Lab venue in New York to pitch our prototype for a digital solution to accelerate social good.

The audience included a team of judges, innovators, social entrepreneurs and business leaders as well as viewers from across the globe watching the live stream. You can watch a replay of the event here.

We were absolutely inspired to be among the finalists and although we didn’t make it through to the final build stage, we have developed a proof of concept website and made some great connections along the way. It was important for us to demonstrate the benefits of making digital products and services accessible, and this was an excellent arena to do this in.

Our Technology Taskforce Manager, Lucy Ruck said: “Working with Topcoder and HPE has been a great experience for us and we need to make that final push to get the site developed fully and identify further sponsorship. By having a fully dynamic AMM, we can really utilise this amazing tool that the Technology Taskforce has developed and support IT professionals in becoming disability-smart.”

To find out more about the Technology Taskforce and the AMM you can contact Lucy at lucyr@businessdisabilityforum.org.uk.

A chance to celebrate and reflect

By Sir Ian Cheshire, Government Lead and Honorary President of Business Disability Forum

There’s something about summer weather that invites a celebration, so it was just as well that it was a beautiful day for our annual Partner Group Reception at Hampton Court Palace on 20 July.

Our Partner Group Reception is an opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved over the last year, and the incredible work made possible by our Partners in terms of raising awareness, sharing ideas and best practice, and in general keeping the conversation around disability and business going.

Delegates and speakers in the audience at the Partner Group Reception

More than 200 delegates attended the Partner Group Reception

This conversation is at the heart of what we do. Talking about disability in a meaningful way brings about real steps forward for employees and businesses alike.

If we as business leaders avoid talking about disability, we don’t get the best out of our employees or from the wider talent pool. This has real practical implications for the workplace: as our keynote speaker Adam Pearson put it, if the conversation around disability is limited to “We have someone with a disability starting on Monday – we’d better get them a chair”, then the relationship between employee and employer simply will not be a productive one. So why do conversations like this still take place in many businesses?

Often, it’s as simple as a lack of understanding or knowledge – this is why bringing together our Partner Group to share ideas and success stories is so crucial to the work of BDF.

Over 200 delegates from our Partner Group attended the event, bringing with them a wealth of knowledge to share. In particular, there were many stories that broke down pre-conceptions around disability and how it might affect someone at work.

One story that no doubt stuck with many at the event was that of Daniel Pruce, a diplomat with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Daniel began experiencing seizures while on a posting in Bangkok a few years ago, and after consulting a doctor found out he had epilepsy. Daniel’s story is an example of how even a life-changing condition need not present obstacles in the workplace. Because his employer was supportive, he felt able to be open about his condition and any adjustments he needed. He could carry on working effectively and using his experience to inform his organisation’s approach to disability. At the same time the FCO were able to retain someone with valuable experience and skills.

This is the kind of success that benefits both employee and employer, and it’s the kind of story we want to hear more of. We know, as Daniel rightly pointed out, that “there is a long road to travel,” even now, which is why it’s so brilliant to see the conversation and exchange of ideas around disability continue when we bring our Partner Group together.

Technical SwapShop – Can technology help our employees with mental health conditions?

2016-06-21 09.56.17

By Dean Haynes, Business Disability Forum

Our latest Technical SwapShop took place on 21 June, hosted by Taskforce member Deloitte. This session focused on mental health, asking the question: “Can technology help our employees with mental health conditions and if so, how?” Chaired once again by BD F Associate Rick Williams, we looked at how new and existing technology could support staff with mental health conditions, along with hearing three alternative viewpoints on mental health in the workplace – from the employee, the organisation and an expert in the field. Outside the auditorium space, we also had a range of exhibitors, including BDF members iansyst, Microlink and Posturite, showing their products that could assist anyone with their productivity.

Proceedings got underway with a brief introduction from Will Smith, Deloitte’s Talent Partner for Audit, where he announced the upcoming relaunch of Deloitte’s own diversity network Workability that aims to promote education, recruitment and retention of disabled staff throughout the business.

Next to take the stage was Jacqui Crane, who spoke of her own experience with mental health issues, and the coping mechanisms and technology she uses to maintain her wellbeing. After living with depression for the last 7 years, something as simple as a notebook (in a particularly fetching shade of pink) with a to-do list consistently helps Jacqui with the day-to-day. On the more technological side, Jacqui told delegates of three apps she also uses to “gamify” her mental health. Moodscope allows users to track their mood, quantifying it to measure the ups and downs at any given time. Habitica provides the user with a cartoon avatar that gains points and abilities as you tick off daily tasks and habits. Lastly, her Fitbit activity tracker lets Jacqui monitor how much she’s moving about and even tracks her sleep, creating goals through the number of steps you take every day, or the amount of sleep you get every night.

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Our next speaker was Heather Cook, Client Director at Brain in Hand. Heather began by telling the room a surprising stat that 1 in 4 people will suffer from some form of mental health issue at some point in their life, and employers have an obligation to support them. Dubbed “your own personal mental filing cabinet”, Brain in Hand provides users with accessible and personalised support for difficult or potentially stressful situations, letting you create your own suite of solutions to lessen anxiety and get additional support as and when you need it.

John Starling, Partner in Consulting at Deloitte, then spoke to attendees about Deloitte’s own Mental Health Champion Network, of which John is one of over twenty members. While the Network is not filled with experts, each member has their own personal connection to mental health issues, so while they are able to help others access resources and guidance, they are also learning themselves. The activity of the Network is promoted within Deloitte as a means to “[affect] a cultural change supporting a more holistic approach to health and well being”, a tenet that could easily be adopted by other companies.

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Following a brief break where delegates were encouraged to visit the rest of our invited exhibitors, such as Remploy, MatchWare, Notetalker, Skill Boosters and SignVideo, BDF’s Senior Disability Consultant Christopher Watkins gave us an insight into BDF’s mental health e-guidance, designed as a tool to upskill line managers in their interactions with staff with possible mental health issues. Using a statistic from BDF’’s own “State of the Nation” report, where 83% of employers surveyed thought that information about adjustments was easy to find versus only 32% of employees who were very confident of finding this information, the e-guidance comes in three modules covering awareness, having these sensitive and occasionally difficult conversations, and finally making adjustments for colleagues with mental health issues.

Our next speaker was David Banes of David Banes Access, who spoke about the relationship between assistive technology and mental health, and more specifically how technology can simultaneously be a help and a hindrance to people. The “always on” nature of technology and its inherent flexibility has adapted to let people work more effectively, using apps to help us collect our thoughts, proofread our writing and even find our way around but, by the same token, the risk of alienation through technology or even cyberbullying has to be taken into account.

Steve Brownlow of Frabjous Day and Rick Williams of Freeney Williams used our last slot on the agenda to talk about the ongoing findings of the Click-Away Pound survey and BDF’s new Access Pathway service.

The Access Pathway is borne out of the e-Check member benefit, where organisations can receive an expert review of a random sample of websites. Since 2008, over 100 reviews have been carried out, with over 70% revealing accessibility and usability issues. Obviously, these issues can have legal, commercial and PR ramifications so they need to be addressed by organisations. The Click-Away Pound survey has thrown up a number of recurring barriers, such as the use of CAPTCHAs and the incorrect use of colour. The Pathway itself comprises three steps: determining the benchmark of accessibility, planning your pathway to improve accessibility, and finally writing a specification and successfully implementing it. For more information on the Access Pathway, please visit: http://businessdisabilityforum.org.uk/advice-and-publications/access-pathway.

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Technology Taskforce Manager Lucy Ruck then took the stage to round up the day’s proceedings, thanking Deloitte for hosting, our speakers for bringing the seemingly-unconnected subjects of accessible technology and mental health to light, and our exhibitors for bringing their wide-ranging products to our delegates’ attention.

You can catch up with the day’s events by searching for the #TTSwapShop hashtag on Twitter.

David Banes of David Banes Access said: “BDF [Technical] SwapShops are more than an exchange of ideas. Each idea, technology and initiative builds upon those of others, offering the potential to create an approach for an organisation where the sum is greater than the parts. Thought provoking and valuable”.

Paul Smyth, Head of IT Accessibility at Barclays said: “This year’s Technology Swap-shop’s focus on mental health and how technology can both help or hinder was really insightful – with a peppering of personal stories,  practical advice, apps and organisations’ approaches to boost awareness, empathy and understanding. The day was less about taboos and more about tools for an area of assistive tech in its infancy but gaining pace”.

Heather Cook, Director of Client Services at Brain in Hand said: “Brain in Hand [was] delighted to be invited to address the audience at the latest Technical SwapShop. The forum gave us a real opportunity to talk about the benefits that Brain in Hand technology is bringing to hundreds of users who are using our software to move forwards with their lives and achieve improved levels of confidence, self-determination and independence. Mental Health affects one in 4 of us throughout our lives, and with the rapid pace of technology and the way smartphones and apps are being used in everyday life, we genuinely believe that using this new technology to support people with mental health conditions will deliver a paradigm shift in the way that support can be personalised and easily accessed by the user using every day familiar technology”.

 

Congenital Heart Defects – how a supportive employer makes all the difference

By Nicola Holt – Head of Digital Marketing, UK and Ireland, Fujitsu


It’s Congenital Heart Defect (CHD) Awareness week this week. These conditions tend to be overlooked in conversations about heart disease, so it’s a good chance to talk about how it can affect people, dispel some common myths; and share some ideas about how employers can make the lives of CHD sufferers a little easier.

Congenital defects start before birth, while the heart is still forming. They come in a variety of types. A hole in the heart is the most common, a condition which is easily fixed nowadays but just a few decades ago would have been debilitating and possibly fatal.

Modern medicine has come a very long way in a short space of time, so people with congenital heart defects have very high survival rates and, usually, a high standard of life. Valves can be replaced, blocked blood vessels can be opened with stents, heart rhythms can be paced, and whole hearts can be transplanted. Despite huge leaps in treatment and technology, a CHD requires lifelong care and often lifelong medication.

Business Disability Forum. Marketing photos

Living with a congenital heart defect

I was diagnosed with CHD when I was 4 and had surgery at 7. In 2014 my pulmonary valve began to fail, and I had surgery to replace it with a shiny new one. I also had a hole fixed, and a pacemaker fitted. As well as some of the more philosophical conclusions people draw when faced with a situation like that, it taught me that an efficient, well-prepared and compassionate employer is vital when you’re faced with a traumatic life event.

What would my employer think?

The last thing you need when you have a heart condition is stress. Work is one of the most common sources of stress at the best of times, and being ill is another one, so that’s an unfortunate combination.

Being told that you have a heart condition can come as a huge shock, and the necessity for invasive open-heart surgery is daunting. It’s important that an employer has processes in place to handle situations like this, and make information about those processes readily available. If it is, people can find out what to expect and plan ahead.

This is particularly important for sick pay. If the policy is clear and fair, it takes away a lot of the stress. If you’re lying in a hospital bed worrying about getting back to work, it’ll take you longer to recover.

My first thoughts, after the initial fear of being told I needed surgery, were about my job. How would they cope without me? Would they tolerate me being off for months? Would I get sick pay? If I didn’t, how would I pay my mortgage? And what about the ongoing care, months of appointments and tests? Because Fujitsu has policies for all of these it didn’t take me long to find out exactly what I needed to do, how much time I could take off, and what the pay situation was.

It’s also vital to create a supportive environment in which people feel comfortable talking about their health issues. It might seem like a very personal thing, but open communication is good for the business as well as the individual.

Friday afternoon, one hour’s notice

You don’t always get a lot of time to plan. I was phoned at 4pm on Friday and asked to go to the hospital for a pulmonary valve replacement the following Monday. An hour’s notice that I’d need around 3 months off.

Hospital timetables are complex and ever-shifting things and if a date comes up, you take it. Because I work in such a supportive environment, I was able to tell everyone what was going on ahead of time without any fear that I’d be judged. That enabled me to get a detailed plan into place so everyone knew what they needed to do and what work they’d be covering.

Even admitting that you have a heart problem is an issue for some people. It’s sometimes seen as a weakness, particularly if the person is in a high-profile, fast-paced job. As an employer, if you make it harder for people to be open about their condition, it’s going to be harder for everyone if one of your employees suddenly disappears for a few months.

The necessity for support doesn’t end with the surgery. In fact, that’s often the easy bit. Open heart surgery takes months to recover from. During that time there are all sorts of issues to manage – mobility is severely restricted, and the medication can make a quick return to work impossible.

Workplace adaptations

Fujitsu sent me to see an occupational health expert as soon as I was well enough to get there. He helped me to identify the adaptations I needed. There’s an easy ordering process for anyone who could benefit from additional help whether it’s technology or a more comfortable chair. When you’ve had your rib cage opened a couple of times, comfort becomes very important!

Those processes meant that I didn’t have to worry about booking appointments or trying to get hold of equipment. If you put too much bureaucracy in the way, people won’t get the help that they need. And, of course, the law obliges employers to make reasonable adjustments to enable people to do their jobs effectively.

Even if a CHD sufferer isn’t having surgery there are adjustments that can be made. Are they expected to carry heavy equipment? That can be an issue with some conditions, as can climbing stairs.

I have a light-weight laptop which is easier for me to carry to meetings; and multiple charging cables so I can dot them around my various working locations. The small things really matter. Employers should all have a policy for providing these.

Returning to work

A phased return to work is crucial so there needs to be a policy in place to manage this. A day or two a week, or a couple of hours a day, maybe some time working from home. Different arrangements will work for different people and different conditions.

I went back to work part time. It was disorientating and difficult. The pain was tough, the painkillers were tough, but the most difficult aspect was just not knowing what was going on. I like to know what everyone is doing and when. I like to have a plan in my head so I can make sure everything gets done. My team handled everything amazingly, but it felt disorientating. They’d coped disturbingly well without me, and I felt like a surplus cog. It took me a few weeks to get back into the swing of things.

Most people who have invasive heart surgery need a lot of aftercare. Cardiac rehabilitation and physiotherapy appointments are usually necessary for several months, and the drug treatments go on for longer. Warfarin treatment means regular blood tests and is usually long-term or even life-long.

The most important thing in this whole process was my line manager. A supportive manager makes all the difference in the world. The bureaucracy was all handled in the background while I was off, he supported me before the process and helped me plan, and all of the communication I received was supportive and helpful.

I was eased back into work with the help of all the people around me, and never felt pushed to do anything beyond my comfort zone. There’s no doubt the attitude of my manager and colleagues helped me to recover more quickly.

Friends and fellow CHD patient stories

I know I’ve been very lucky. A quick survey of friends and fellow CHD patients threw up a disturbing selection of stories from people with less supportive employers. Some were sent dozens of letters asking for updates and sick notes, some were pushed into returning to work when they weren’t ready and became ill again.

Some were passed over for promotion and believed it to be entirely because they were seen as weak, or a liability. Some even lost their jobs because their employers didn’t want to employ people who would need time off for treatment; or quit because they couldn’t cope with the stress of all the bureaucracy. All of their employers have lost out. They’ve let people go who were hard-working, dedicated and capable, just because they didn’t have the right support and processes in place.

I think what’s most impressive about the Fujitsu approach is the genuine desire to improve, continuously. The SEED group is there for long term support. Communication, training and processes are being analysed and improved to make them more effective. A happy and healthy workforce is recognised as being good for business, and the people improving these processes really care.

What could you do differently at work to help people with long-term health conditions?

Busting some myths around Congenital Heart Defects

  • Congenital heart defects aren’t lifestyle related. Staying healthy is a good idea but it doesn’t cause the defects. They’re often genetic.
  • A cure is difficult. Many people need repeated surgery throughout their lives and rely on drugs to stay healthy. Sometimes people need surgery every ten years or so, particularly if valves need replacing.
  • It’s not just about the heart. Chronic conditions like this are associated with pain, anxiety and depression so it’s important to take a holistic view
  • It doesn’t affect everyone in the same way. Some people will struggle to climb stairs and get out of breath easily. Others can climb mountains. It depends on the type and severity of the condition.
  • It’s not that rare. It’s the most common congenital defect, affecting almost 1% of the population
  • You can’t tell when someone has a heart condition. Just because someone looks healthy doesn’t mean that they are, and a lot of the issues associated with CHD are hidden. You can sometimes spot us by the impressive selection of scars though!
  • Heart problems affect people of every age. CHD is a congenital condition, it’s there before birth and throughout life.

For more information or to visit the Fujitsu Responsible Business blog – visit: http://blog.uk.fujitsu.com/category/responsible-business/#.VsNDyXSLReU 

The Click Away Pound survey is officially launched

Rick Williams, Managing Director of Freeney Williams Ltd talks website accessibility, assistive technology and why UK businesses are risking their bottom line.


 

“Here’s a question: does the Equality Act place obligations on business about making their websites accessible and usable for disabled people? Well… err…yes.

OK, so the second question: why is it so many websites aren’t readily accessible or usable for disabled people? I don’t know the answer but it puzzles me.

I’m a blind guy and use a screen reader – you know, that bit of software that reads out what’s on the screen with a voice like Micky Mouse on helium. I would say I was quite an experienced user but it amazes me the number of websites that I find hard to use or can’t use at all! This is so frequent now I got to the point of not even noticing. I just tried one and if it didn’t work I tried another wherever possible. Last year I started keeping stats just for my own curiosity. When doing a search for something new, especially if I wanted to buy something, it was surprising to find that I would typically look at three or four sites before I found one I could use easily.

Business Disability Forum. Marketing photos

Do I contact the sites I can’t access and take up the issues? Actually, I’ve given up. I have done it but… well they usually don’t understand or even reply.

On the other hand if I find a site I can use then I use it as much as possible; often even if I know I might be able to get things cheaper elsewhere. For example, I find it easier to have my supermarket shopping delivered and the best site I found to use is Ocado, so I use it. I know some things would be cheaper elsewhere but, well, the accessibility of the site and the app make it so easy why would I bother to look elsewhere when my experience tells me I’m likely to find problems.

The other thing that I find odd is that my company has been running Business Disability Forum’s e-check service http://www.e-check-it.com since 2008. In that time 70% of the sites we’ve reviewed were given a ‘red’ assessment – in other words ‘significant potential commercial, PR or legal risk’. Even more surprising is the low number of organisations who have got such assessments who’ve done anything about it!

So, putting this together: there is a law but it isn’t that successful and many businesses don’t seem to think this is an issue. OK, so what we need to do is find out what this costs businesses and maybe the bottom line will persuade them that website accessibility and usability is important as a business issue.

Working with Business Disability Forum and supported by the RNIB and Enterprise Rent-a-Car we’ve just launched the Click-Away Pound survey, which aims to find out what disabled people’s experiences are when shopping online, what they do about problematic sites and the potential costs to business of not thinking about the issue.

If you have a disability give it a go – only takes 10 minutes and will help improve the Internet experience for disabled people.”

For more information and to take the survey visit: http://www.clickawaypound.com

Rick Williams
Managing Director
Freeney Williams Ltd
http://www.freeneywilliams.com

Blue Monday’s dirty secret (and why it doesn’t matter)

By Christopher Watkins, Disability Consultant, Business Disability Forum


 

Today is the third Monday of January; so-called Blue Monday, apparently ‘the most depressing’ day of the year. It’s around this time of year that I get a glut of companies phoning me up to ask if I could speak at their mental health awareness event, run a workshop, or advise on the health & wellbeing activities they are planning to ‘celebrate’ the big day. And it makes a great deal of sense to do so: performance dips and sickness absence peaks are a well-recognised phenomenon in January, and such wellbeing exercises can minimise the effects of these on overall business performance. An eye-catching ‘day’ to attach an agenda to can also be a useful tool to raise larger issues across large organisations and promote cultural change.

I must confess, however, that I have mixed feelings towards the ubiquitous mass of awareness days at the best of times. My cynical side is frequently frustrated by the idea that by simply ‘raising awareness’ of an issue we somehow make a meaningful difference to society or individuals’ lives. And then there’s so many of them! Did you know that next month is not only National Heart Month[1] and Raynaud’s Awareness Month[2], but Cholangiocarcinoma Awareness Month as well[3]? Within the first week of February alone, we have World Cancer Day (4 Feb)[4], National Doodle Day (for Epilepsy, 5 Feb)[5] and ‘Wear it Beat it’ (for the British Heart Foundation, 6 Feb)[6], before a week of Tinnitus awareness starting on 8 Feb[7]?

Business Disability Forum. Marketing photos

‘Blue Monday’ might just wind me up more than the rest put together, not only because it is an issue close to my heart, but because it hides a dirty secret; one which, I fear, those working in the area are embarrassed to admit lest it promote cynicism towards the wider agenda. I have taken to asking organisations planning their Blue Monday events what they understand the meaning of the day to be, and have heard responses describing it as anything from the day on which people are most likely to be off sick with depression, the annual peak for deaths by suicide, the day in which people are most likely to self-report as being depressed…

Unfortunately, the reality is that Blue Monday has about as much to do with credible research into the seasonal prevalence of mental ill-health as the 1983 New Order masterpiece by the same name. The third Monday in January is, in fact, the day on which is it easiest to sell you a summer holiday.

Or, more specifically, it is a widely discredited invention peddled by PR company Porter Novelli on behalf of Sky Travel about ten years ago. It claims to be based on an entirely nonsensical formula based on metrics including ‘travel time’, ‘delays’, ‘time spent packing’, and a number of other factors without defined units of measurement[8]. To be fair, by a 2009 press release the formula seems to have been reviewed to consider slightly more reasonable factors like ‘weather’, ‘debt’ and ‘time since failing new year’s resolutions’, again without any defined units of measurements but reassuringly (or miraculously) coming up with exactly the same day[9].

I’m not, to be clear, passing judgement on any of the causes or issues behind these awareness events and don’t for one minute want to suggest that they shouldn’t be taken seriously. It’s easy to see, however, how well-meaning businesses and diversity teams can get bogged down in a relentless calendar of ‘awareness raising’, to the extent that they might lose sight of what’s really important: the benefits to business, individuals and society as a whole delivered by diverse workforces and inclusive practices. My message is simply to take a step back and consider the purpose of any event or wellbeing exercise you are taking part in today, and specifically the value these activities add for the time, effort and money invested.

So, have I been turning down these Blue Monday speaking engagements on principle, then? Of course not. After all, almost every awareness day is essentially ‘made up’, and it would be foolish to dismiss them on this basis. If you are currently investing in mental health in your organisation, it makes great sense to attach your activities to a (rightly or wrongly) recognised ‘awareness day’. It’s also perfectly sensible to invest in mental wellbeing at this time of year because you have identified that performance or sickness absence issues peak in the winter months. But for the sake of not just pedantry but transparency and credibility, please let’s stop calling Blue Monday ‘the most depressing day of the year’ and rather see it for what it is: a potentially useful tool to promote meaningful cultural change and reap the benefits of a healthy and inclusive workplace and society, with no need for a fabricated ‘meaning’ beyond that. Let’s have the courage to be led by tangible and empirically-founded diversity and inclusion priorities based on business and cultural need, not the unrelenting calendar of awareness events!

[1] http://www.bhf.org.uk/#sthash.TroBQktw.dpuf

[2] http://www.raynauds.org.uk/#sthash.TroBQktw.dpuf

[3] http://www.ammf.org.uk/#sthash.TroBQktw.dpuf

[4] http://www.worldcancercampaign.org/#sthash.TroBQktw.dpuf

[5] http://doodle-day.epilepsy.org.uk/

[6] https://wearitbeatit.bhf.org.uk/

[7] http://www.tinnitus.org.uk/#sthash.TroBQktw.dpuf

[8] http://www.theguardian.com/science/2006/dec/16/badscience.uknews

[9] https://web.archive.org/web/20100221213456/http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/media/news-releases/news-releases-2009/13-january-2009


You can talk to Christopher at christopherw@businessdisabilityforum.org.uk or Tweet him at @chrispydubbs

The Apprentice – you’re hired!

By Charles Clement, Disability Consultant, Business Disability Forum.

Charles Photo 

Recruiting the right candidate can be a challenging business. How do you make sure you get the right person with all of the skills necessary to do the job?

If you’ve been following the las t 12 weeks of The Apprentice you’ll see that more and more candidates are expected to show a diverse range of skills, not only technical abilities, but personal and social skills too. Just like Lord Sugar employers are increasingly using a diverse range of methods to test applicants. However, these can present all manner of challenges for disabled applicants. There is a legal duty to make adjustments for disabled candidates during the recruitment process. Let’s see what changes Lord Sugar could have made during the process.

First of all, there is the ‘brainstorming’ session at the start of each task. Everyone is vying to be heard and talking over each other and it can turn in to a bit of a bunfight. This could be really stressful for someone who feels anxious easily. The unstructured nature of these meetings may also cause problems for people who are hard of hearing. One of the most effective things here would be to do some planning beforehand. A clear agenda of what is going to be discussed and when would make the meetings a little less stressful and help deaf candidates keep track of what was happening. Another easy change that could be made would be to ask everyone to speak one at a time. This may help those who needed to lip read or use an interpreter. But wouldn’t these changes make the task easier for everyone? And just think how much more productive they would be.

Then there are all the tasks that require candidates to run around buildings or warehouses taking measurements on the fly or adding things up in their head – no calculators allowed. Now this is just asking for mistakes to be made – disabled or not. And if you have a condition such as dyslexia, this might be particularly challenging. Why not allow people some quiet time and space to double check figures and make sure they are right or, better still, allow them to use a calculator. I’m assuming that you wouldn’t ban calculators from the workplace too?

And what about the creative challenges such as creating and branding a product? Not everyone will feel comfortable with this type of challenge – particularly perhaps if you have Asperger’s Syndrome or autism, and might feel more comfortable working with figures or processes (although of course this isn’t the case for everyone). Often, people will only apply for roles they think that they can do; so if someone applies for a role as an accountant, don’t give them a generic test that requires creative thinking, unless that is required in the job.

With all this in mind, Lord Sugar might actually decide it would be reasonable to allow some candidates to bypass the process completely and do a work trial on the job. But I suppose that wouldn’t make very good television.

To ensure your recruitment process is inclusive and giving your business access the widest talent pool, contact Business Disability Forum (BDF) for more advice. BDF member organisations can get in touch with our Advice service on 020-7403-3020.